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How to take advantage of Florida's hurricane sales tax holiday

Hurricane season is here, and right now people in Florida can stock up on storm necessities without paying sales tax.

>> Watch the news report here

>> Florida’s 10 safest cities in a hurricane

Florida’s Disaster Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday runs through Thursday, June 7.

>> 5 things to know before hurricane season

Some of the qualifying items include: 

  • Reusable ice (selling for $10 or less)
  • Candles, flashlights, lanterns, and any portable self-powered light source powered by battery, solar, hand-crank or gas (selling for $20 or less)
  • Any gas or diesel fuel container, including LP gas and kerosene containers (selling for $30 or less)
  • Nonelectrical coolers and ice chests for food storage ($30 or less)
  • Bungee cords ($50 or less)
  • Ground anchor systems ($50 or less)
  • Radios (two-way or weather band) powered by battery, solar, or hand crank ($50 or less)
  • Ratchet straps ($50 or less)
  • Tarps ($50 or less)
  • Tie-down kits ($50 or less)
  • Visqueen, plastic sheeting, plastic drop cloths, and other flexible waterproof sheeting ($50 or less)
  • Portable generators that can be used for light, communications, or to preserve food in the event of a power outage ($750 or less)

>> Hurricane evacuation: Helpful apps for finding gas, hotel rooms, traffic routes

Food and other canned goods are not included in the tax holiday.

>> Read more trending news 

Click here to read the complete list of qualifying items and restrictions.

Storms, possible tornado ravage parts of metro Atlanta

A powerful storm system swept through north Georgia overnight, sending trees into roads, damaging homes and businesses, knocking out power to thousands and leaving south Fulton County a disaster zone.

>> Watch the news report here

>> PHOTOS: Storms blow through the South, leave damage in wake

More than 130 severe weather reports of large hail, damaging wind and possible tornadoes came in Monday, according to WSB-TV in Atlanta.

>> Tornado facts and safety: Everything you need to know

“The severe thunderstorm and tornado threat is over in north Georgia,” WSB-TV meteorologist Brian Monahan said. “But the cleanup is about to get underway.”

In Cobb County, a tree crashed into a home on Glenroy Place. Lightning hit a home in Gwinnett County. And in Clayton County, a fire damaged an eight-unit apartment in the 7200 block of Tara Boulevard.

>> These are the safest places in your home during a tornado

Food, shelter and other essentials were provided for 17 people affected by the fire, American Red Cross of Georgia spokeswoman Sherry Nicholson said.

But the most severe damage was reported in south Fulton and Haralson counties.

>> What's the difference between tornado watch and warning?

Storms ravaged homes and cars in a subdivision off Campbellton Fairburn Road.

“We expect a busy day ahead as daylight approaches, increasing visibility in hard-hit areas,” Nicholson said. “Currently, a team is on the ground in Fairburn, where homes in the Jumpers Trail neighborhood suffered significant damage.”

>> For complete coverage of the storms’ aftermath, head to AJC.com and WSBTV.com

The Haralson County School District canceled school and activities Tuesday “due to storm damage throughout our community that may make bus service impossible,” the district said on Facebook.

Georgia Power reported 273 outages affecting 10,025 customers.

“The electric membership cooperatives were hit hard as severe weather, and possible tornadoes, pounded many parts of Georgia last night, interrupting power to 13,000 customers, primarily in the west part of the state,” Georgia EMC spokeswoman Terri Statham said.

>> Read more trending news 

Ontario Alvarez was at his mother’s home in the 7100 block of Jumpers Trail with his 13-year-old brother when the storm moved in late Monday.

To protect the family, he dragged a mattress in a bathroom, where everyone hid to avoid the storm’s path.

“We’re from Florida, so we’re used to hurricanes,” Alvarez said. “But this was different. We didn’t see it coming. We didn’t know what to do.”

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