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Wreckage of WWII warship the 5 Sullivan brothers served on discovered

The wreckage of a World War II warship, whose crew fatalities included five brothers, was found in the South Pacific Ocean, KWWL reported.

>> Read more trending news

The USS Juneau was torpedoed by the Japanese and sank near the Solomon Islands on Nov. 13, 1942, with nearly 700 sailors killed.

The Sullivan brothers of Waterloo, Iowa -- George, Francis, Joseph, Madison and Albert -- enlisted together after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and requested to serve on the same ship, KWWL reported.

The ship was discovered Saturday night, nearly 3 miles below the ocean’s surface, by a team privately funded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, KWWL reported. It was the third ship Allen’s company has found within a year

"It is a remarkable discovery. It is a ship people have been looking for for a long time," said Sam LaGrone, the editor of the U.S. Naval Institute News. 

"The fact that you were able to find this ship and the fact that you found the USS Lexington and the USS Indianapolis; all of these historic ships, found by just one crew in a short amount of time is revelatory," LaGrone said "It is a banner day for oceanography and for people just getting up and doing it themselves because these ships have been missing for almost 80 years."

The discovery team will notify the U.S. Navy with the exact location of the ship, KWWL reported.

Albert Sullivan’s granddaughter, Kelly Ann Sullivan Loughren, released a statement Monday, noting that the Sullivan family “is thinking and praying for all of the families of all who lost loved ones” on the USS Juneau.

“It's poignant that they discovered it on the 75th anniversary year of the loss of the ship and also on St. Patrick's Day,” she said. “The luck of the Irish was with their crew on discovery day.”

A Navy destroyer, USS The Sullivans, was named for the brothers.

2 Florida airmen among 7 killed in Iraq helicopter crash

Two Florida airmen were among seven killed in a helicopter crash Thursday in Iraq.

Master Sgt. William R. Posch, 36, of Indialantic, Florida, and Staff Sgt. Carl P. Enis, 31, of Tallahassee belonged to the 308th Rescue Squadron out of Patrick Air Force Base.

They were on a HH-60 Pave Hawk with five other airmen when it crashed Thursday in western Iraq.

>> Read more trending news 

Enis and Posch were serving in combat roles, as they had before on multiple overseas deployments during their Air Force careers, according to a release from the 920th Rescue Wing.

Posch was an 18-year Air Force veteran who was recently part of a rescue mission at sea to save two German sailors whose sailboat caught fire last July.

He deployed for multiple rescue missions in Texas during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Posch's family and friends shared photos of him on social media, saying he was a father.

Four airmen assigned to the 106th Rescue Wing at the Francis S. Gabreski Air National Guard Base, New York, were also killed:

  • Capt. Andreas B. O'Keeffe, 37, of Center Moriches, New York.
  • Capt. Christopher T. Zanetis, 37, of Long Island City, New York.
  • Master Sgt. Christopher J. Raguso, 39, of Commack, New York.
  • Staff Sgt. Dashan J. Briggs, 30, of Port Jefferson Station, New York.

Capt. Mark K. Weber, 29, of Colorado Springs, was also killed in the crash. He was assigned to the 38th Rescue Squadron at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia.

The Pave Hawk went down at 6:45 p.m. Thursday near the town of Qaim in Anbar Province near the Syrian border.

The helicopter was on a routine flight between two towns, according to officials quoted by The Associated Press and Stars and Stripes.

Gov. Rick Scott released a statement about the airmen's deaths on Sunday: 

"The loss of Master Sgt. William R. Posch, Staff Sgt. Carl Enis and their fellow armed service members is devastating. The deaths of these brave men serve as a solemn reminder of the sacrifice and commitment made by our nation’s military to secure and protect the freedom we all cherish as Americans. Ann and I know Staff Sgt. Enis’ family personally, and we grieve with them today. I ask that every Floridian pause to remember Master Sgt. William R. Posch and Staff Sgt. Enis and all of those lost in this tragedy.”

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Airmen’s small talk, jokes during air refueling goes viral

You’re flying at hundreds of miles an hour, thousands of feet above the Earth. What would you be doing while two planes are tethered during a refueling run?

You’d be totally serious, during the maneuvers. Or you could take the lead from Senior Airman Jordan Smith, who has a tendency to lighten the mood when he’s filling up fighters from his flying gas station in the sky, according to the Defense Department.

>> Read more trending news 

Smith is a member of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing and is a crew member on a KC-10. He’s also known as the crew’s chef or the pizza guy who cooks for his crew while they’re in the air.

He will crack jokes or have riddles for the pilots of F-22s as they wait to top off their fuel tanks, according to the Defense Department.

They also talk about what they miss while on deployment, like Chick-fil-A.

Click here to listen to some of the other banter between crew members aboard the two planes.

Wreckage of World War II carrier USS Lexington found in Coral Sea

Wreckage from the aircraft carrier USS Lexington, sunk by the Japanese during the Battle of the Coral Sea in World War II, has been discovered off the Australian coast.

>> Watch the news report here

>> Read more trending news 

A team of explorers led by billionaire Paul Allen, the Microsoft co-founder, made the announcement Monday.

>> On Listen as crew of R/V Petrel discovers the wreckage

According to CNN, the wreckage was found in the Coral Sea by the expedition crew of Research Vessel (R/V) Petrel.

>> Nor’easter uncovers Revolutionary War-era shipwreck in Maine

The aircraft carrier, dubbed the “Lady Lex,” was lost in May 1942, along with 216 crew members and 35 aircraft, during what historians consider the first carrier battle in history. More than 2,000 crew members were rescued.

NC war veteran honored on 100th birthday

The Durham Veterans Administration threw a big party for a North Carolina veteran on her 100th birthday.

>> Read more trending news

Millie Veasey was a member of the only all-black, all-female battalion to serve overseas during World War II, where she was stationed in England and France.

When Veasey returned home, she earned a college degree and became the first female president of Raleigh's NAACP chapter.

In 2016, President Barack Obama recognized her service.

She said her faith helped her reach the century milestone after enlisting during the Jim Crow era.

“Lord, make me an instrument of your peace,” she said. “Where there is hatred, let me show love. Where there is injury, pardon.”

Veasey will be honored this weekend with a luncheon at her alma mater, St. Augustine's College in Raleigh.

Deployed troops will be able to watch NFL playoff games

UPDATE, 10:03 a.m. 1/21/2018: Despite the shutdown of the United States government early Saturday, the NFL announced Sunday morning that the Armed Forces Network will  air the AFC and NFC Championship games.

>> Read more trending news 

The NFL also said it is providing free access to the games via NFL Game Pass to all USO centers.

Meanwhile, Congress is back at work Sunday, attempting to create a deal to end the shutdown. 

ORIGINAL STORY: As a result of lawmakers failing to resolve a standoff over immigration and spending, the United States government has been shut down indefinitely – meaning everyone has been affected, including troops overseas.

>> Watch the news report here

There is a lot of fallout from the shutdown. From government employees who aren't being paid, including the Defense Department, to the Armed Forces Network being taken off the air, the effects of a standstill government can be felt across the board.

Since the AFN has been taken off the air, that means many of our troops overseas won't be able to watch the NFL playoffs Sunday

Surely it's not the biggest issue surrounding a government shutdown, but it's a big morale issue. 

>> Trump campaign ad calls Democrats 'complicit' in killings by undocumented immigrants

Watching the Patriots on the Armed Forces Network has been a comforting piece of home for army Sgt. Matt Connolly, who's serving in South Korea.

"It's kind of the only thing we can do for fun over here," Connolly told WFXT.

For the first time since he's been stationed in Korea, his family came to visit him for the AFC Championship game.

"I'm actually on leave right now. My family from Boston is here right now and we were looking forward to watching the game," Connolly said.

With no one to run it, AFN is off the air. 

>> John Legend blames Trump for government shutdown, calls him racist

The NFL says it is providing free access to Sunday's Championships via the NFL Game Pass to all USO centers.

"No matter what, I'm going to watch them," Connolly said.

Sen. Ed Markey says he's in a holding pattern right now as he says he and most of his colleagues are preparing to negotiate through the night – but it's still unclear if that will be an option.

Immigration issues are at the center of the shutdown. Many Republicans don't want to negotiate on those issues until a spending bill is passed and the government re-opens.

However, those immigration issues – including the DREAMERS Act – are a priority for many Democrats. 

Markey told WFXT that he believes everyone needs to continue working to find some sort of compromise, and he wants President Donald Trump to take the lead.

"Bill Belichick is telling the New England Patriots for tomorrow, 'Do your job,' and we are saying to President Trump for tomorrow, 'Do your job, Mr. President. Make sure that the funding is there for our troops. Make sure that our defense is taken care of, but make sure that we also protect child health and the Dreamers,' but thus far he's been unwilling to do his job," Markey said.

Read more here.

Former U.S. Navy officers face negligent homicide charges in collisions

The U.S. Navy has announced that five officers, including two commanders, will face negligent homicide charges connected to separate incidents involving the USS Fitzgerald and the USS John S. McCain that cost 17 sailors their lives.

>> Watch the news report here

A Navy spokesman, Capt. Greg Hicks, said the charges, which also include dereliction of duty and endangering a ship, will be presented to what the military calls an Article 32 hearing to determine whether the accused are taken to trial in a court-martial.

The disciplinary actions were decided by Adm. Frank Caldwell and are the latest in a series of moves the Navy has made in the aftermath of the deadly collisions, which investigators concluded were avoidable. It fired several top leaders, including the commander of the 7th Fleet, Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, and several other senior commanders in the Pacific.

>> Read more trending news 

The Navy said it is filing at least three charges against four officers of the Fitzgerald, including the commanding officer, who was Cmdr. Bryce Benson at the time. Benson suffered a head injury in the collision and was airlifted to the U.S. Naval Hospital at Yokosuka, Japan. A Navy investigation found that Benson left the ship’s bridge before the collision. Also facing charges are two lieutenants and one lieutenant junior grade, whose names were not disclosed. The Navy said all four face criminal charges, including negligent homicide, dereliction of duty and endangering a ship.

Fewer officers from the McCain are being charged. The Navy said the ship’s commander at the time, Cmdr. Alfredo J. Sanchez, is being charged with negligent homicide, dereliction of duty and endangering a ship. A chief petty officer, whose name was not disclosed, faces a charge of dereliction of duty.

In a statement, Hicks said the announcement of charges Tuesday is “not intended to and does not reflect a determination of guilt or innocence related to any offenses. All individuals alleged to have committed misconduct are entitled to a presumption of innocence.”

In June, the 7th Fleet notified families of the seven sailors who drowned after a 29,060-ton container ship called the ACX Crystal collided with the USS Fitzgerald.

The Navy identified the deceased then as Gunner’s Mate Seaman Dakota Kyle Rigsby, 19, of Palmyra, Va.; Yeoman 3rd Class Shingo Alexander Douglass, 25, of San Diego, Calif.; Sonar Technician 3rd Class Ngoc T. Truong Huynh, 25, of Oakville, Conn.; Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Noe Hernandez, 26, of Weslaco, Texas; Fire Controlman 2nd Class Carlosvictor Ganzon Sibayan, 23, of Chula Vista, Calif.; Personnel Specialist 1st Class Xavier Alec Martin, 24, of Halethorpe, Md; Fire Controlman 1st Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr., 37, of Elyria, Ohio.

Divers found the missing sailors after they were able to gain access to parts of the USS Fitzgerald that were damaged in the collision.

Two months later, the USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided, killing 10 U.S. sailors.

The deceased in that incident: Electronics Technician 1st Class Charles Nathan Findley, 31, Amazonia, Mo.; Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Abraham Lopez, 39, El Paso; Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kevin Sayer Bushell, 26, Gaithersburg, Md.; Electronics Technician 2nd Class Jacob Daniel Drake, 21, Cable, Ohio; Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Timothy Thomas Eckels Jr., 23, Manchester, Md.; Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Corey George Ingram, 28, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.; Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, 26, Suffield, Conn.; Electronics Technician 3rd Class John Henry Hoagland III, 20, Killeen, Tex.; Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Logan Stephen Palmer, 23, Decatur, Ill.; Electronics Technician 3rd Class, Kenneth Aaron Smith, 22, Cherry Hill, N.J.

The Navy dismissed three-star commander of the U.S. Seventh Fleet Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin in August after “los[ing] confidence in his ability to command.”

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Worker who sent mistaken missile message reassigned

The person who hit the button that sent an emergency alert warning people living in or visiting Hawaii that a ballistic missile was heading to the island state has been reassigned.

Officials have not named the person responsible, but NBC News reported that the person has a new job that is not connected to the emergency alert system.

USAToday reported that the person at the center of the mistaken alert, and who has been reassigned has worked for the agency for a decade. 

“All we will say is that the individual has been temporarily reassigned within our Emergency Operations Center pending the outcome of our internal investigation, and it is currently in a role that does not provide access to the warning system,” Richard Rapoza, a spokesman for Hawaii Emergency Management System told NBC News.

Rapoza did not disclose what the person’s job is.

>>Missile threat alert in Hawaii is false alarm, rattles nerves

The worker ran an internal test Saturday and was supposed to select a template that would have kept the message internally. Instead the person chose the template that sends the message to everyone, CNN reported

The fail-safe for sending a message is a warning that requires the person to confirm the message is to be sent. The person clicked “yes” instead of “no” and sent the message to everyone in Hawaii, including radio and television stations, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Hawaii has been running siren tests since North Korea announced that it has the capability to hit the U.S. with a missile. The tests have been suspended as officials investigate the message that was sent over the weekend. Officials have also set up a new template for false alarms, CNN reported

Minutes after the alert went out, Hawaiian officials said there was no threat via social media. 

But it took nearly 40 minutes for a second alert to be pushed out to devices through the alert system.

A smashing idea: In this Georgia town, you can pay to drive, crush cars in tank

Eight years ago, Todd Liebross was scanning the news online when he came across an article about an interesting place in Europe.

Visitors could pay to drive around in tanks. That’s right — tanks. This idea and business really struck a chord with him. It was something he could feasibly do near where he lives in Morganton, Georgia.

>> Read more trending news 

Liebross floated the idea to his wife. Initially, she wasn’t in favor of opening a tank driving course, but he asked her to think about it for a month.

He made a deal with her: during that month, he wouldn’t bother her. All she had to do was to casually mention it and float the idea to her friends and coworkers. If after a month, it still didn’t seem like a good idea, they wouldn’t do it.

After a month, the results were overwhelmingly positive, and Liebross was “off to the races.”

RELATED: This former Army pilot swapped the sky for the track to make his living from model railroading

After thee years of going through the initial paperwork and insurance, and importing the tanks, Liebross was in business.

It’s been five years now, and Tank Town USA is doing better than ever, especially for a business built almost completely on customers spreading the word. Anyone can visit and drive the 1960s era British APCs (Armored Personnel Carriers). It’s a place built on enjoyment. People come from all over the world to fulfill a dream of driving a tank.

On our trip to Tank Town, we witnessed one person after another smiling ear to ear as they barreled through the mud, toppling over (and through) old cars. (Oh, did we mention that you can crush cars? At Tank Town USA, you absolutely can.)

Over the years, Liebross has added more accouterments, because it’s the little details that make each trip truly special, like spray painting messages on the cars first, or taking a sledgehammer to the windows before you roll over the vehicle with the muddy tracks of the tank. He’s also added the ability to drive an excavator, which is surprisingly more fun and complex than we thought. If that’s not enough to convince you to check out this adult playground, there’s also an old Browning M1919 machine gun.

We had never witnessed a bunch of grown men laughing and giggling as hard as they did after their day at Tank Town USA.

Liebross enjoys the fulfillment that his business brings. He took a risk and broke away from the mold, and it’s paying off. That’s not to say there hasn’t been a lot of hard work over the years, but it’s truly something special watching adults’ faces light up as they fire 300 rounds a minute through a machine gun that was made almost 100 years ago, or as they completely flatten an old car. It’s the truest representation of a Rare Pursuit, and we’re all for it!

Army veteran pulls over, stands for funeral procession for man who served in WWII

A photo of a truck driver who pulled over to stand for a funeral procession for a fellow veteran is going viral.

>> Watch the news report here

Facebook user Kristen Collins uploaded the stirring image over the weekend. She’s the granddaughter of Fred Ladage, who recently passed away at 91. He served in the Navy and Navy Reserve during World War II.

>> See the photo here

When the family went to transport Ladage to his final resting place in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery near St. Louis, they encountered Bradley Faulkner on Interstate 70. Faulkner — a truck driver and nine-year veteran who served in Iraq — had stopped his truck, stepped out and put his hand over his heart as their procession passed, according to KSDK. A member of a military family with a grandfather who also served, Faulkner considered it important to stop and stand.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

Kristen Collins was moved. She took the picture and posted it to Facebook. She wasn’t ready for what happened next, though.

The photo made the rounds on the internet, and made its way to Faulkner’s wife. They arranged to meet, and Faulkner drove from his home in Missouri to meet Kristen Collins.

>> Read more trending news 

“It’s just such an honor to be able to meet the person that made such an impact on us for a moment in time,” Collins said of their meeting.

Faulkner, meanwhile, says the choice to stop that day was an easy one.

"It doesn’t change or alter your life at all to maybe lift up that one family and say, ‘Hey, in your time of need, I’m here for you whether I know you or not,'" he said.

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